What the Chancellor of Justice does not do?

The authority of the Chancellor of Justice does not extend to supervision of parliamentary proceedings or the actions of the Members of Parliament in their Parliamentary mandate.

Legal persons under private law, such as limited companies, do not fall within the scope of the supervisory authority of the Chancellor of Justice, unless such companies are assigned with public administrative tasks.  This is also true for limited companies that are fully owned by the State or a municipality.

Private citizens are also considered to be beyond the scope of the supervisory authority held by the Chancellor of Justice.

Due to the parallel supervisory nature of the Chancellor of Justice and the Parliamentary Ombudsman, the Chancellor of Justice does not investigate complaints that have already been handled or are currently being handled by the Parliamentary Ombudsman.

The Chancellor of Justice cannot change or reverse any decision issued by a court of law or other authority.

The Chancellor of Justice cannot oblige an authority to implement an individual official action or issue any orders in relation to such an action. Thus, the Chancellor of Justice cannot, for example, oblige social services to make a decision concerning the payment of subsistence support, or issue any provisions on the amount of the benefits to be paid.

The Chancellor of Justice does not have the authority to demand that the police investigate a private person suspected of committing a crime or to issue any instructions or orders concerning an investigation.

The Chancellor of Justice does not investigate a complaint if it concerns a matter that is currently open for appeal to appeal authorities.  

The Chancellor of Justice cannot provide juridical or legal advice.

The Chancellor of Justice cannot demand that compensation be paid for damages.